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Nanotechnology engineering produces a water splitter that runs on an ordinary AAA battery

In 2015, American consumers will finally be able to purchase fuel cell cars from Toyota and other manufacturers. Although touted as zero-emissions vehicles, most of the cars will run on hydrogen made from natural gas, a fossil fuel that contributes to global warming. Now scientists at Stanford University have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis.  The battery sends an electric current through two electrodes that split liquid water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. Unlike other water splitters that use precious-metal catalysts, the electrodes in the Stanford device are made of inexpensive and abundant nickel and iron. "Using nickel and iron, which are cheap materials, we were able to make the electrocatalysts active enough to split water at room temperature with a single 1.5-volt battery," said Hongjie Dai, a professor of chemistry at Stanford. "This is the first time anyone has used non-precious metal catalysts to split water at a voltage that low. It's quite remarkable, because normally you need expensive metals, like platinum or iridium, to achieve that voltage." In addition to producing hydrogen, the novel water splitter could be used to make chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide, an important industrial chemi ...

Mark Shwartz August 27, 2014 51
Graphene rubber bands could stretch limits of current healthcare, new research finds

New research published today in the journal ACS Nano ("Sensitive, High-Strain, High-Rate Bodily Motion Sensors Based on Graphene–Rubber Composites") identifies a new type of sensor that can monitor body movements and could help revolutionise healthcare. Although body motion sensors already exist in different forms, they have not been widely used due to their complexity and cost of production. Now researchers from the University of Surrey and Trinity College Dublin have for the first time treated common elastic bands with graphene, to create a flexible sensor that is sensitive enough for medical use and can be made cheaply. Once treated, the rubber bands remain highly pliable. By fusing this material with graphene - which imparts an electromechanical response on movement – the team discovered that the material can be used as a sensor to measure a patient's breathing, heart rate or movement, alerting doctors to any irregularities.  "Until now, no such sensor has been produced that meets needs and that can be easily made. It sounds like a simple concept, but our graphene-infused rubber bands could really help to revolutionise remote healthcare," said Dr Alan Dalton from the University of Surrey. Co-author, Professor Jonathan Coleman from Trinity College, Dublin commented, "T ...

University of Surrey August 20, 2014 90
NSF Workshop for a Future Nanotechnology Infrastructure Support Program Webcast

On August 18 and 19, 2014 the NSF will conduct a Workshop for a Future Nanotechnology Infrastructure Support Program.The workshop is a next step in NSF's preparation for developing a program to succeed the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN), after having received community input in response to a recent Dear Colleague Letter (DCL 14-068). To broaden engagement, portions of the Workshop for a Future Nanotechnology Infrastructure Support Program will be webcast. (The approximate webcast times shown below are Eastern Daylight Time.) The workshop will convene a panel of experts from academe, industry, and government to: develop a vision of how a future nanotechnology infrastructure support program could be structured, and determine the key needs for the broad user communities over the coming decade.  The workshop is co-chaired by Dr. Thomas Theis (IBM Research, on assignment to the Semiconductor Research Corporation) and Dr. Mark Tuominen (University of Massachusetts, Amherst). More details are in the workshop agenda. Webcast: August 18, 2014 8:00 AM  to 12:00 PM and August 19, 2014 8:00 AM ...

NSF August 13, 2014 238
Biodegradable, Nanoscale Thin Films Release Drugs in Steady Doses Over a Long Period of Time

About one in four older adults suffers from chronic pain. Many of those people take medication, usually as pills. But this is not an ideal way of treating pain: Patients must take medicine frequently, and can suffer side effects, since the contents of pills spread through the bloodstream to the whole body. Now researchers at MIT have refined a technique that could enable pain medication and other drugs to be released directly to specific parts of the body — and in steady doses over a period of up to 14 months.  The method uses biodegradable, nanoscale “thin films” laden with drug molecules that are absorbed into the body in an incremental process. “It’s been hard to develop something that releases [medication] for more than a couple of months,” says Paula Hammond, the David H. Koch Professor in Engineering at MIT, and a co-author of a new paper on the advance. “Now we’re looking at a way of creating an extremely thin film or coating that’s very dense with a drug, and yet releases at a constant rate for very long time periods.” In the paper, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe the method used in the new drug-delivery system, which significantly exceeds the release duration achieved by most commercial controlled-release b ...

Peter Dizikes | MIT News Office August 06, 2014 220
JSNN nanomanufacturing group adds members

 An organization established by the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering and Gateway University Research Park in Greensboro to build partnerships between academic researchers and industry has grown to 25 members in its first year, according to an update from the JSNN. The Nanomanufacturing Innovation Consortium was formed in July 2013 with an initial group of members that included RF Micro Devices, Syngenta and VF Jeanswear among others. Members pay a fee to join the NIC and in return gain access to the JSNN’s cutting-edge equipment as well as access to ideas and expertise from the school’s scientists. Other companies have joined since including International Textile Group’s Cone Denim and Burlington divisions, Callaway Carbons, Horiba and AxNano. The 25th member of the group and the most recent to join is Luna Innovations (NASDAQ: LUNA), a Roanoke company that makes fiber optic tools for the telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, energy and defense industries. Cone Denim’s Tom Tantillo said his company is already seeing benefits from its first few months as part of the NIC. “This is proving to be an invaluable resource to our organic growth as well as our market competitiveness,” he said. “Having access to the robust tool set and knowledge base at the JSNN gi ...

Matt Evans - Triad Business Journal July 30, 2014 44
Researchers achieve 'holy grail' of battery design: A stable lithium anode

The development could lead to smaller, cheaper and more efficient rechargeable batteries. Engineers across the globe have been racing to design smaller, cheaper and more efficient rechargeable batteries to meet the power storage needs of everything from handheld gadgets to electric cars. In a paper published today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, researchers at Stanford University report that they have taken a big step toward accomplishing what battery designers have been trying to do for decades – design a pure lithium anode. All batteries have three basic components: an electrolyte to provide electrons, an anode to discharge those electrons and a cathode to receive them. Today, we say we have lithium batteries, but that is only partly true. What we have are lithium ion batteries. The lithium is in the electrolyte but not in the anode. An anode of pure lithium would be a huge boost to battery efficiency. “Of all the materials that one might use in an anode, lithium has the greatest potential. Some call it the Holy Grail,” said Yi Cui, a professor of Materials Science and Engineering and leader of the research team. “It is very lightweight, and it has the highest energy density. You get more power per volume and weight, leading to lighter, smaller batteries with more power.” But enginee ...

Andrew Myers | Stanford Engineering July 30, 2014 111
Progress Review on the Coordinated Implementation of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) 2011 Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Strategy

The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology, National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), will hold a public webinar on Thursday, July 31, 2014 from 12 pm to 1 pm EDT. The purpose of this webinar is to provide a forum to answer questions related to the Federal Government's “Progress Review on the Coordinated Implementation of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) 2011 Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Strategy.” Discussion during the webinar will focus on the research activities undertaken by NNI agencies to advance the current state of the science as highlighted in the progress review. Representative research activities as provided in the Progress Review will be discussed in the context of the 2011 NNI EHS Research Strategy's six core research areas: Nanomaterial Measurement Infrastructure, Human Exposure Assessment, Human Health, the Environment, Risk Assessment and Risk Management Methods, and Informatics and Modeling. A moderator will identify relevant questions and pose them to the panel of NNI agency representatives during the live webinar. Due to time constraints, not all questions may be addressed. The moderator reserves the right to group si ...

Science and Technology Policy Office July 24, 2014 87
Carbodeon enables 20 percent increase in polymer thermal filler conductivity with 0.03 wt.% nanodiamond additive at a lower cost than with traditional fillers

Vantaa, Finland – 9th July 2014: Carbodeon, a Finnish-based producer of functionalised nanodiamond materials, can now achieve a 20 percent increase in polymer thermal performance by using as little as 0.03 wt.% nanodiamond material at 45 percent thermal filler loading, enabling increased performance at a lower cost than with traditional fillers. Last October, Carbodeon published its data on thermal fillers showing that the conductivity of polyamide 66 (PA66) based thermal compound could be increased by 25 percent by replacing 0.1 wt.% of the typically maximum effective level of boron nitride filler (45 wt.%) with the company’s application fine-tuned nanodiamond material. The latest refinements in nanodiamond materials and compound manufacturing allow similar level performance improvements but with 70 percent less nanodiamond consumption and thus, greatly reduced cost. The samples were manufactured at the VTT Technical Research Centre in Finland and their thermal performance was analyzed by ESK (3M) in Germany. “The performance improvements achieved are derived from the extremely high thermal conductivity of diamond, our ability to optimise the nanodiamond filler affinity to applied polymers and other thermal fillers and finally, Carbodeon’s improvements in nanodiamond filler agglomeration control,” said Carbodeon C ...

Camille Closs, Watch PR July 09, 2014 48
Researchers Develop Novel Way to Waterproof Materials by Adding Exterior Surface Grooves

Researchers from Kyoto University in Japan have developed a novel way to waterproof new functionalized materials involved in gas storage and separation by adding exterior surface grooves. Their study, published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, provides a blueprint for researchers to build similar materials involved in industrial applications, such as high performance gas separation and energy storage.

Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences July 01, 2014 163
Graphene Flagship initiative doubles in size

To coincide with Graphene Week 2014, the Graphene Flagship is proud to announce that today one of the largest-ever European research initiatives is doubling in size. 66 new partners are being invited to join the consortium following the results of a €9 million competitive call. While most partners are universities and research institutes, the share of  companies, mainly SMEs, involved is increasing. This shows the growing interest of economic actors in graphene. The partnership now includes more than 140 organisations from 23 countries. It is fully set to take ‘wonder material’ graphene and related layered materials  from academic laboratories to everyday use. Vice-President of the European Commission @NeelieKroesEU, responsible for the Digital Agenda, welcomed the extended partnership: “Europe is leading the graphene revolution. This ‘wonder material has the potential dramatically to improve our lives: it stimulates new medical technologies, such as artificial retinas, and more sustainable transport with light and ultra-efficient batteries. The more we can unlock the potential of graphene, the better!” SMEs on the Rise The 66 new partners come from 19 countries, six of which are new to the consortium: Belarus, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary and Israel. With its 16 ...

Graphene Flagship June 25, 2014 46
Novel nanoparticle production method could lead to better lights, lenses, solar cells

Sandia National Laboratories has come up with an inexpensive way to synthesize titanium-dioxide nanoparticles and is seeking partners who can demonstrate the process at industrial scale for everything from solar cells to light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Titanium-dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles show great promise as fillers to tune the refractive index of anti-reflective coatings on signs and optical encapsulants for LEDs, solar cells and other optical devices. Optical encapsulants are coverings or coatings, usually made of silicone, that protect a device. Industry has largely shunned TiO2 nanoparticles because they’ve been difficult and expensive to make, and current methods produce particles that are too large. Sandia became interested in TiO2 for optical encapsulants because of its work on LED materials for solid-state lighting.Current production methods for TiO2 often require high-temperature processing or costly surfactants — molecules that bind to something to make it soluble in another material, like dish soap does with fat. Those methods produce less-than-ideal nanoparticles that are very expensive, can vary widely in size and show significant particle clumping, called agglomeration. Sandia’s technique, on the other hand, uses readily available, low-cost materials and results in nanoparticles that ...

Sue Holmes June 18, 2014 165
University of Massachusetts Amherst Purchases Nanonex Advanced 8” Nanoimprint Tool NX-2608BA

 It features all imprint forms: thermal, photo-curable, and embossing, with sub-5 nm imprinting resolution, up to 8 inches wafer size. Based on the Nanonex unique patented Air Cushion PressTM technology, the NX-2608BA offers unsurpassed uniformity regardless of backside topology, wafer or mask flatness, or backside contamination. This ACP technology also eliminates lateral shifting between the mask and substrate, which significantly increases mask lifetime. The small thermal mass design allows fast thermal cycling, resulting in a fast process cycle. The new NX-2600BA system is the second Nanonex nanoimprint equipment purchased by UMass Amherst. Both Nanonex nanoimprint systems will be located at the new UMass Life Sciences Center at UMass Amherst to support the center’s multidisciplinary research, that include nanoimprint material and processing, nanoimprint mold fabrication and duplication, roll-to-roll nanoimprint, bio/chemical sensors, etc. Nanonex is excited to supply the cutting-edge nanoimprint tool to UMass Amherst’s new Life Sciences Center.Source: Nanonex

Nanonex May 29, 2014 74
SEMATECH Achieves Breakthrough Defect Reductions in EUV Mask Blanks

SEMATECH announced today that researchers have reached a significant milestone in reducing tool-generated defects from the multi-layer deposition of mask blanks used for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, pushing the technology another significant step toward readiness for high-volume manufacturing (HVM). Following a four-year effort to improve deposition tool hardware, process parameters and substrate cleaning techniques, technologists at SEMATECH have, for the first time, deposited EUV multilayers with zero defects per mask at 100 nm sensitivity (SiO2 equivalent). Eliminating these large “killer” defects is essential for the use of EUV in early product development. These results were achieved on a 40 bi-layer Si/Mo film stack and measured over the entire mask blank quality area of 132×132 mm2. In addition, by subtracting out incoming substrate defects, SEMATECH has demonstrated that the multilayer deposition process itself can achieve zero defects down to 50 nm sensitivity. Coupled with novel improvements to the mask substrate cleaning process to remove incoming defects, this represents the capability to both extend EUV to future nodes by eliminating smaller “killer” defects, and as a step to reducing smaller defects (which can be mit ...

SEMATECH Inc. May 07, 2014 121
New material for flat semiconductors

Researchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells. Now, researchers at MIT and Harvard University have found a two-dimensional material whose properties are very similar to graphene, but with some distinct advantages — including the fact that this material naturally has a usable bandgap. The research, just published online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, was carried out by MIT assistant professor of chemistry Mircea Dincă and seven co-authors. The new material, a combination of nickel and an organic compound called HITP, also has the advantage of self-assembly: Its constituents naturally assemble themselves, a “bottom-up” approach that could lend itself to easier manufacturing and tuning of desired properties by adjusting relative amounts of the ingredients. Research on such two-dimensional materials, which often possess extraordinary properties, is “all the rage these days, and for good reason,” Dincă says. Graphene, for example, has extremely good electrical and thermal conductivity, as well as great strength. But its lack of a ...

David L. Chandler, MIT News Office May 02, 2014 75
New MIT Building will be a Hub for Nanoscale Research

Starting in 2018, researchers from across MIT will be able to take advantage of comprehensive facilities for nanoscale research in a new building to be constructed at the very heart of the Cambridge campus. The 200,000-square-foot building, called "MIT.nano," will house state-of-the-art cleanroom, imaging, and prototyping facilities supporting research with nanoscale materials and processes - in fields including energy, health, life sciences, quantum sciences, electronics, and manufacturing. An estimated 2,000 MIT researchers may ultimately make use of the building, says electrical engineering professor Vladimir Bulović, faculty lead on the MIT.nano project and associate dean for innovation in the School of Engineering.

David L. Chandler, MIT News Office April 30, 2014 425
How to create nanowires only three atoms wide with an electron beam

Junhao Lin, a Vanderbilt University Ph.D. student and visiting scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has found a way to use a finely focused beam of electrons to create some of the smallest wires ever made. The flexible metallic wires are only three atoms wide: One thousandth the width of the microscopic wires used to connect the transistors in today’s integrated circuits. Lin’s achievement is described in an article published online on April 28 by the journal Nature Nanotechnology. According to his advisor Sokrates Pantelides, University Distinguished Professor of Physics and Engineering at Vanderbilt University, and his collaborators at ORNL, the technique represents an exciting new way to manipulate matter at the nanoscale and should give a boost to efforts to create electronic circuits out of atomic monolayers, the thinnest possible form factor for solid objects. “Junhao took this project and really ran with it,” said Pantelides. Lin made the tiny wires from a special family of semiconducting materials that naturally form monolayers. These materials, called transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), are made by combining the metals molybdenum or tungsten with either sulfur or selenium. The best-known member of the family is molybdenum disulfide, a common mineral that is used as a solid lubricant. A ...

David Salisbury April 28, 2014 71
Thomas Swan Announces Agreement With Trinity College Dublin to Manufacture Graphene Using an Exciting New Process

Thomas Swan announces an exclusive agreement to manufacture high quality graphene products by an exciting new process developed by researchers at Trinity College Dublin. The new process uses high shear mixing techniques to produce high quality graphene nanoplatelets. Thomas Swan has launched two new graphene products based upon this process – Elicarb® Graphene Powder and Elicarb® Graphene Dispersion (AQ). The new approach was discovered in a two year collaboration with Professor Jonathan Coleman at the AMBER materials science centre in Trinity College Dublin and published recently in the journal, Nature Materials. The publication has received much media attention as it highlights the simplicity of a high shear mixing route to graphene and gives examples of application of these materials in polymer reinforcement, conductive films, solar cells and strain sensors. "This method gives lots of graphene with no defects. In the lab, we produced grams. However, when scaled up, tonnes will be produced." commented Prof. Coleman and he added "This project shows how industry and academic collaboration can lead to research of the highest calibre, with real commercial applications". "This exfoliation process can deliver high quality graphene at industrial scales for the first time. Our focus is now on building a scaled process to provide a rel ...

Thomas Swan & Co. Ltd. April 24, 2014 71
NBMC Workshop - Wearable Electronics Technology & Applications in Health & Human Performance

Join this workshop to examine the growing interest and technical advancements in flexible electronics for wearable health and human performance sensors, including biometric and biomarkers sensors.

Nano Bio Manufacturing Consortium April 24, 2014 85
Thinnest Feasible Membrane Produced

A new nano-membrane made out of the “super material” graphene is extremely light and breathable. Not only can this open the door to a new generation of functional waterproof clothing, but also to ultra-rapid filtration. The membrane produced by the researchers at ETH Zurich is as thin as is technologically possible.

Fabio Bergamin, ETH Zurich April 24, 2014 130
A Solution For Graphene Production

Graphene is easy to acquire, at least in small amounts. The first scientists to isolate the strong, two-dimensional carbon material simply pressed a piece of Scotch tape to a chunk of graphite and peeled it off. But mass production of graphene for commercial uses remains a challenge. Now, scientists have shown they can rapidly produce large quantities of graphene using a bath of inorganic salts and an electric current (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/ja5017156). Several other methods have been developed for producing graphene, but each has its drawbacks. Growing the carbon sheets takes too long, and chemical vapor deposition requires a metal catalyst, with a second step to remove the metal. Other methods using solvents or surfactants can harm the electronic properties of graphene or produce lower yields. Xinliang Feng and Klaus Müllen of the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, in Mainz, Germany, and their colleagues decided to improve upon an electrochemical technique for producing graphene. Instead of using acids, which oxidize the graphene and reduce its conductivity, the researchers prepared solutions of various salts, including ammonium sulfate, potassium sulfate, and sodium sulfate. Into their mixtures they placed two electrodes, one made of platinum and the other of graphite, which is ess ...

Neil Savage, Staff C&EN April 18, 2014 81
UGA researchers develop scalable methods for manufacturing metamaterials

Metamaterials, or materials that have had their matter rearranged so they interact with light in specific ways, could be key to making everything from super lenses for satellite surveillance to biosensors that can detect Alzheimer's disease—if they weren't so expensive to fabricate. A one-millimeter-square sample can take up to two weeks to produce. University of Georgia researchers led by Yiping Zhao recently published three papers documenting a simple method to fabricate metamaterials that could lead to industrial-scale production. The first two studies appeared in the journal Nano Letters and the third in the March issue of Advanced Optical Materials. Zhao is a professor in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences department of physics and astronomy and director of the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center. His co-authors on the studies were research assistants George Larsen, Yizhuo He and Whitney Ingram. "What we do in the lab is try to think about simple, scalable methods," said Larsen, who along with He is supported by the National Science Foundation. Ingram is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Minority Ph.D. Scholar and a Southern Regional Educational Board State Doctoral Scholar. "Metamaterials depend on good optical properties and precise arrangements, so our work interfaces with nanotechnology and mic ...

Alan Flurry, Producer and Editor, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences April 18, 2014 49
Imerys FiberLean™ and Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries Keynote Presenters at the TAPPI International Nanotechnology Conference

Per Svending, Commercial Director, Imerys FiberLean and Allan Ward, President and Chief Operating Officer, Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries Inc., will deliver keynote presentations at the 2014 TAPPI International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials. The 9th annual conference, June 23 - 26, 2014 in Vancouver, B.C., Canada, explores how nanotechnology can transform biomaterials into high-value products.“The science of nanotechnology in renewable materials continues to advance rapidly and our keynote speakers will provide an exciting update on the most recent developments in commercialization and research for improving cellulose based products,” notes Conference Co-Chair Orlando Rojas of North Carolina State University. “It provides a thought provoking kick off to the conference and provides attendees insight into cutting edge nanotechnologies that can be used to develop a whole new generation of value added products that are environmentally sound and sustainable.”Svending/Ward   Svending has 35 years of paper industry experience in a range of management and technical roles. He worked for Eka Chemicals and Stora Papyrus before joining English China Clays, now Imerys. He is one of the inventors of the FiberLean process and is currently heading up the commercialization efforts for this brea ...

Deborah Chafin, TAPPI Marketing April 16, 2014 113
Perfect nanospheres using ultrashort laser pulses

The Nanophotonics Group of the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed a method to print nanoparticles made of different materials with controlled, reproducible sizes and to precisely deposit these particles on a receiver substrate. As a result, for the first time, the scientists succeeded in generating and positioning perfectly round silicon nanoparticles with a diameter of 165 nm. This method was presented in the March 4th issue of Nature Communications. For the first time, scientists at the LZH were able to fabricate perfectly round silicon nanoparticles with a diameter of 165 nm and to arrange them in ordered structures. This was achieved with their newly developed method that was published in the March 4th issue of Nature Communications. This novel method uses ultrashort laser pulses to print nanoparticles with sizes in the two to three digit nanometer range made of different materials, such as metals, semiconductors and dielectrics. Afterwards, these nanoparticles can be precisely deposited on a receiver substrate.Molten silicon forms nanoparticles which, due to the surface tension, fly onto a receiver substrate. (Image: LZH)  Nanoparticles exhibit the unique optical property to scatter only light of a particular wavelength. Irradiated with white light and depending on their size, shape and on ...

Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. April 16, 2014 25
Researchers use common spray gun to create self-assembling nanoparticle films

The promise of nanoparticles stems from their potential to modify the physical and mechanical properties of polymers for diverse applications, such as photovoltaic cells, sensors, and separation membranes. Methods currently used to create desired nanostructure, however, rely on complex and energy-intensive techniques, such as layer-by-layer or patterning approaches, which are limited in scale and often have poor stability.Publishing in Nature Communications (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms4589), Dr. Minhao Wong, a former graduate research assistant in the Polymer Technology Center of Dr. H-J Sue, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Dr. Ryohei Ishige of I2CNER (International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research), Kyushu University in Japan, have developed a simple approach of applying a surface coating of thin, flat nanoplatelets using a common spray gun, such as can be purchased off-the-shelf from an art supply store, to create a surface coating in which nanoplatelets spontaneously self-assemble into “nano-walls.” The nano-walls act as rigid barriers that prevent oxygen gas from reaching the surface, and are effective at low and high humidity levels.Using this scalable and simple processing method, researchers have achieved extremely fine and highly ordered nano-scale features that are conventionally achieved with c ...

Ann Stephen - Texas A&M University April 16, 2014 38
U.S. National Nanotechnology Coordination Office Seeks Next Director

The National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) in the Executive Office of the President is seeking candidates interested in serving as the Director of the U.S. National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO). The NNCO supports the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), the U.S. Federal Government’s interagency activity for coordinating research and development as well as enhancing communication and collaborative activities in nanoscale science, engineering, and technology. The NNCO acts as the primary point of contact for information on the NNI; provides technical and administrative support to the Initiative, including the preparation of multiagency planning, budget, and assessment documents; develops, updates, and maintains the NNI website www.nano.gov; and provides public outreach on behalf of the NNI. The NNCO is currently hosted by the National Science Foundation with offices in Arlington, Virginia.

National Nanotechnology Coordination Office April 09, 2014 143
Industry Veteran Fergus Clarke Joins Picodeon as CEO

APPOINTMENT COMES AS PICODEON PREPARES FOR GROWTH Picodeon, a Finnish coating technology specialist today announced that Fergus Clarke has joined the company as Chief Executive Officer. Clarke brings over 25 years of global high technology management experience. His appointment comes at a point where Picodeon is experiencing strong interest from OEMs in Battery, LED, Optical, and Life Science applications. “We are delighted to have Fergus Clarke join our team. Fergus’ depth of leadership experience at Applied Materials and smaller high growth companies will be important as Picodeon grows its business to meet the demand from our customer base,” said Nikolay Danilov, Chairman of the Board, at Picodeon.

Camille Closs, Watch PR April 08, 2014 14
Cheap, Better-Performing Lithium-ion Batteries with Nanowires

Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have improved the performance and capacity of lithium batteries by developing better-performing, cheaper materials for use in anodes and cathodes (negative and positive electrodes, respectively). Lithium-ion batteries are a popular type of rechargeable battery commonly found in portable electronics and electric or hybrid cars. Traditionally, lithium-ion batteries contain a graphite anode, but silicon has recently emerged as a promising anode substitute because it is the second most abundant element on earth and has a theoretical capacity of 3600 milliamp hours per gram (mAh/g), almost 10 times the capacity of graphite. The capacity of a lithium-ion battery is determined by how many lithium ions can be stored in the cathode and anode. Using silicon in the anode increases the battery’s capacity dramatically because one silicon atom can bond up to 3.75 lithium ions, whereas with a graphite anode six carbon atoms are needed for every lithium atom. The USC Viterbi team developed a cost-effective (and therefore commercially viable) silicon anode with a stable capacity above 1100 mAh/g for extended 600 cycles, making their anode nearly three times more powerful and longer lasting than a typical commercial anode.

Megan Hazle, University of Southern California April 03, 2014 205
Arevo Labs Announces Carbon Fiber and Nanotube-Reinforced High Performance Materials for 3D Printing Process

Arevo Labs, a Silicon Valley startup, announced today the availability of technology and materials to create Ultra Strong High Performance Polymer parts using a 3D printing process. Supported materials include High Performance Polymers such as KetaSpire® PEEK, AvaSpire® PAEK, Radel® PPSU and PrimoSpire® SRP. Arevo’s offering consists of Proprietary Carbon Fiber and Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Reinforced High Performance Materials, printing technology compatible with commercially available filament fusion 3D Printers and specialized software algorithms to create 3D objects with deterministic mechanical properties.

Michael Newsom, LouVan Communications Inc. March 28, 2014 93
Picodeon’s PLD Technology Enables Microstructural Control

Finnish thin film coating specialist Picodeon Ltd Oy has developed its ultra-short pulsed laser deposition (USPLD) surface coating technology to be able to create either porous or dense aluminium oxide (Al2O3) coatings on heat-sensitive substrates for use in a wide range of industrial metallisation applications.

Camille Closs, Watch PR March 20, 2014 100
Stanford Engineers Make Flexible Carbon Nanotube Circuits More Reliable and Efficient

Engineers would love to create flexible electronic devices, such as e-readers that could be folded to fit into a pocket. One approach involves designing circuits based on electronic fibers, known as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), instead of rigid silicon chips. But reliability is essential. Most silicon chips are based on a type of circuit design that allows them to function flawlessly even when the device experiences power fluctuations. However, it is much more challenging to do so with CNT circuits.

Tom Abate, Associate Director of Communications, Stanford Engineering March 19, 2014 274
Elmarco Enabled Industrial Electrospinning Technology for Laboratories

Elmarco introduces the updated Nanospider™ ("NS") LAB – the first product update to the world’s best selling nanofiber research tool which was originally launched in 2005 at the Nanotech exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. Designed for experimental work on nanofiber material and applications, this new product incorporates years of customer feedback and product support. With a smaller footprint and lower cost, the NS LAB now makes use of the stationary wire electrode first introduced into Elmarco’s industrial lines in 2010.

Martin Kopic, Marketing Manager, ELMARCO s.r.o. March 05, 2014 118
Carbodeon NanoDiamonds PTFE Coating doubles surface durability and reduces friction by up to 66 percent

Surface coatings specialist Carbodeon has released a new PTFE/NanoDiamond coating with twice the durability and up to 66 percent less friction than current products. The new coating has huge potential to cost-effectively reduce CO2 output and fuel demand, as well as to improve equipment lifespan, in fields such as the automotive, aerospace and industrial machinery industries.

Camille Closs March 05, 2014 164
SRC and MIT Extend High Resolution Lithography Capabilities

MIT researchers sponsored by Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), the world’s leading university-research consortium for semiconductors and related technologies, have introduced new directed self-assembly (DSA) techniques that promise to help semiconductor manufacturers develop more advanced and less expensive components. The MIT research focuses on the issue of next-generation lithography in the semiconductor manufacturing process. Photolithography at a 193 nanometer (nm) wavelength is currently used for semiconductor device manufacturing, but that is reaching its limit with feature sizes around 25 nm. Electron-beam lithography can produce smaller features and is used for mask making, one of the critical steps in semiconductor manufacturing. However, the throughput of electron-beam lithography is currently insufficient for sub-20 nm resolution patterning over large areas.

Dan Francisco, Semiconductor Research Corporation February 27, 2014 162
Molecular Imprints' Semiconductor Business To Be Acquired By Canon

Molecular Imprints Inc. (MII), the market and technology leader for nanopatterning systems and solutions, today announced it has signed an agreement to sell its semiconductor imprint lithography equipment business to Canon Inc. of Tokyo, Japan. Canon currently manufactures and markets KrF excimer and i-line illumination optical lithography platforms. Canon began conducting research into nanoimprint technology in 2004 to enter the market for lithography equipment for leading-edge high-resolution patterning. Since 2009, the Company has been carrying out joint development with MII and a major semiconductor manufacturer for mass production using MII’s Jet and Flash™ Imprint Lithography (J-FIL™) technology.

Molecular Imprints, Inc. February 20, 2014 169
Self-cleaning Solar Panel Coating Optimizes Energy Collection, Reduces Costs

Soiling -- the accumulation of dust and sand -- on solar power reflectors and photovoltaic cells is one of the main efficiency drags for solar power plants, capable of reducing reflectivity up to 50 percent in 14 days. Though plants can perform manual cleaning and brushing with deionized water and detergent, this labor-intensive routine significantly raises operating and maintenance costs (O&M), which is reflected in the cost of solar energy for consumers. Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a low-cost, transparent, anti-soiling (or self-cleaning) coating for solar reflectors to optimize energy efficiency while lowering O&M costs and avoiding negative environmental impacts.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory January 30, 2014 255
Pixelligent Awarded DOE SBIR Phase I Grant to Develop Nanocrystal Dispersions for OLED Lighting

Pixelligent Technologies, manufacturer of PixClear™ and leading producer of advanced high index materials for demanding applications in the solid-state lighting, flat panel display, and optical components and films markets, announced today that it has been awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I grant by the Department of Energy (DOE). The nine-month, $150,000 program will enable Pixelligent to accelerate the development of its proprietary nanocrystal dispersions for use in OLED lighting. As part of this program, Pixelligent will partner with OLEDWorks LLC, a leading OLED lighting company.

Pixelligent Technologies, LLC January 29, 2014 84
United States Department of Defense Provides $18.5 Million in New Funding to Expand Nanocomp Technologies' Nanomanufacturing Production Capacity

Nanocomp Technologies, Inc., a developer of performance materials and products composed of its unique carbon nanotubes (CNTs), today announced it has been awarded $18.5 million in additional funding under the Defense Production Act Title III program ("DPA Title III") to supply CNT yarn, sheet, tape, and slurry materials for the program needs of the Department of Defense, as well as for commercial industrial markets. The mission of the DPA Title III Program is to create assured and affordable production of products that have been identified as essential for national defense, but where U.S. industry has not demonstrated an ability to deliver due to market conditions or other fiscal barriers. By means of a Presidential Determination, Nanocomp's CNT materials were identified to satisfy this critical gap. Initial funding of $2.2 M was provided by DPA Title III in 2011, along with substantial Company investments, enabling Nanocomp to construct a 30,000 square foot Pilot Plant, the nation's largest, and relocate its headquarters to Merrimack, NH.

Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. January 15, 2014 419
New Packaging Plastic that Protects as Good as Aluminum Foil

Tera-Barrier Films (TBF) Pte Ltd, a spin-off company from A*STAR’s Institute of Materials Research and Engineering’s (IMRE), has invented a new plastic film using a revolutionary nano-inspired process that makes the material thinner but as effective as aluminium foil in keeping air and moisture at bay. The stretchable plastic could be an alternative for prolonging shelf-life of pharmaceuticals, food and electronics, bridging the gap of aluminium foil and transparent oxide films.

A*STAR January 07, 2014 343
NanoTechMap: The First Online Exhibition of Nanotechnology

The French company NanoThinking announces the release of the NanoTechMap: it gives a comprehensive view of the industrial offer in the field of nanotechnology and provides more visibility to actors in this field for a very modest cost compare to standard exhibitions.

Thomas Dubouchet, NanoThinking December 20, 2013 241
Soligie Receives Two R&D Awards from FlexTech Alliance

FlexTech Alliance today announced two R&D awards to Soligie of Savage, Minn. The intent of the awards is to advance flexible, printed electronics manufacturing and obtain delivery of innovative project demonstrators in 2014. The initial award is to a Soligie–led team comprising Boeing, American Semiconductor and Imprint Energy. The team will develop and demonstrate a sensor platform leveraging printed components and silicon-on-polymer technology to achieve a thin, conformable and lightweight form factor. The goal is commercializing a sensing system consisting of a power source, microcontroller, display, and wireless communication channel, as well as an interchangeable or disposable portion that can be chosen by the user based on the application. Commercial and military applications include vital sign monitoring, environmental monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics, structural health monitoring, and many others.

FlexTech Alliance December 19, 2013 154
3M and Cambrios Collaborate to Produce Flexible Silver Nanowire Film for Touch Screens

3M announces the launch of a new touch sensor film, 3M™ Patterned Silver Nanowire Film, that combines the expertise of two leading technology and manufacturing companies to provide the quality, unique attributes, and volume that touch screen manufacturers demand. 3M plans to ramp up its total global touch sensor film manufacturing capacity to more than 600,000 square meters per month in 2014, which includes 3M™ Patterned Silver Nanowire Touch Sensor Film, 3M™ Patterned Metal Mesh Touch Sensor Film and 3M™ Advanced ITO Touch Sensor Film. This capacity will help support the growing demand for consumer touch enabled devices such as tablets, laptops, all-in-ones (AIO) and monitors.

3M Company December 19, 2013 384
ASTM International Nanotechnology Committee Approves Airborne Nanoparticle Measurement Standard

Nanomaterials are used in the manufacture of a wide range of products, encompassing medicine, textiles, automobile parts, personal care products, food packaging and sporting goods. During the manufacture and use of these products, there is a potential for nanomaterials to become airborne, resulting in inhalation exposure to workers and consumers. A new ASTM International standard provides clear steps to collect airborne nanomaterials and analyze them to determine their surface area.

ASTM December 12, 2013 200
Rolith, Inc. Wins the 2013 Best Manufacturing Technology Award from the Printed Electronics Industry

Rolith, Inc., a leader in advanced nanostructured devices, is pleased to announce that Printed Electronics Industry selected Rolith for the Best Manufacturing Technology award based on its production of transparent metal mesh conductors for large touch screen displays, OLED lighting and photovoltaics.

Rolith, Inc. November 26, 2013 144
Testing Smart Plastics in Real Time

Nano additives can make plastics scratch and flame proof, or give them antibacterial properties. For this to work, the particle distribution within the plastic compound must be absolutely correct. A new device is now able to test the distribution in real time.

Irma Mikonsaari, Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology November 25, 2013 102
Now Accepting Public Comment on the draft NNI 2014 Strategic Plan

The U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative requests public comment on the draft 2014 NNI Strategic Plan. Comments may be submitted through http://nano.gov/2014strategy or to 2014NNIStrategy@nnco.nano.gov.

National Nanotechnology Initiative November 20, 2013 167
Public Comment Requested for Manufacturing Network's Suggested Metrics, IP Guidelines

The federal interagency Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO) has issued for public comment draft performance metrics and intellectual-property-management guidelines for President Obama's proposed National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).

Mark Bello, NIST November 18, 2013 155
NIA unveils its Regulatory Monitoring Database

The Nanotechnology Industries Association (NIA) today launched its Regulatory Monitoring Database. This Database is a comprehensive tool that allows its users to monitor nano-specific regulations and standards around the world.

Nanotechnology Industries Association (NIA) November 13, 2013 181
Request for Information: NNI Nanotechnology for Sensors and Sensors for Nanotechnology Signature Initiative

The purpose of this Request for Information (RFI) is to enhance the value of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) and of the Nanotechnology Signature Initiative (NSI) entitled Nanotechnology for Sensors and Sensors for Nanotechnology in particular, by reaching out to the nanotechnology stakeholder community for input regarding specific needs for the accelerated development and commercialization of nanosensors. This RFI is intended to inform planning for a public workshop organized under the auspices of the sensors NSI.

Science and Technology Policy Office / NNCO November 06, 2013 191
Grant Funds Development of Improved Nanoscale Additive Manufacturing

A new Department of Energy grant will fund research to advance an additive manufacturing technique for fabricating three-dimensional (3D) nanoscale structures from a variety of materials. Using high-speed, thermally-energized jets to deliver both precursor materials and inert gas, the research will focus on dramatically accelerating growth, improving the purity and increasing the aspect ratio of the 3D structures.

John Toon - Georgia Institute of Technology October 31, 2013 83
Using Data Science Tools to Discover New Nanostructured Materials

Researchers at Columbia Engineering, led by Chemical Engineering Professors Venkat Venkatasubramanian and Sanat Kumar, have developed a new approach to designing novel nanostructured materials through an inverse design framework using genetic algorithms. The study, published in the October 28 Early Online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), is the first to demonstrate the application of this methodology to the design of self-assembled nanostructures, and shows the potential of machine learning and “big data” approaches embodied in the new Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering at Columbia. “Our framework can help speed up the materials discovery process,” says Venkatasubramanian, Samuel Ruben-Peter G. Viele Professor of Engineering, and co-author of the paper. “In a sense, we are leveraging how nature discovers new materials—the Darwinian model of evolution—by suitably marrying it with computational methods. It’s Darwin on steroids!”

Holly Evarts - Columbia University October 30, 2013 99
 
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